8fbd035081bd09934004bfc61d79c31c5d5d9ee4

Bonsai trees stolen from Oakland garden near Lake Merritt

In the East Bay, there was an unusual theft of priceless and cherished tiny trees. 

It happened at the Bonsai Garden near Lake Merritt in Oakland on Wednesday morning, around 4:15 a.m. 

Thieves stole eight artistic and valuable Japanese-style trees, valued at over $20,000. But it’s not the value, according to Director Gordon Deeg, who’s volunteered at the garden for over 20 years. 

He said, “The fact is, they’re not replaceable.” Surveillance video caught one of the thieves carrying off a tree. It’s thought there were two masked burglars. 

The thieves had to penetrate two fences, dodge surveillance cameras and seemed to selectively choose the bonsai specimens they carried off. 

The garden is staffed by volunteers. Some who have put in several hours every week for years. The trees are donated, grown from seeds and some are very rare and valuable. 

A volunteer carefully cares for a bonsai tree in the collection in the Bonsai Garden in Oakland near Lake Merritt.

Gary, who did not give his last name, is the curator of the garden, and has been coming at least twice a week for 23 years. He said, “This is the fourth time in two years. This time they came and just kicked in the fence and took wire cutters to cut the wired portions and carried out every tree they could carry.” 

Volunteers at the 25-year-old garden are asking people to keep an eye out online, as the bonsai trees stolen last April were found to be for sale on

Read the rest

Eight ‘priceless’ BONSAI trees are stolen from volunteer garden in crime-ridden Oakland – the fourth such theft in two years – as California city’s progressive

A volunteer-run garden in Oakland has been stolen from for the fourth time in two years, losing eight ‘priceless’ bonsai trees, as the mayor and district attorney of the city are both facing recall efforts over crime.

Thieves broke through the wall of the Bonsai Garden in Lake Merritt, California, twice on Wednesday evening and Thursday early morning, making off with eight bonsai trees worth approximately $20,000 in total.

‘While you can put a dollar amount on these trees, they are technically priceless because you’ll never find another tree like them,’ Suzanne Muller, the garden’s assistant director, told the San Francisco Chronicle.

Despite wooden walls, metal fences and a surveillance camera, the thieves managed to break into the garden and steal the trees, including a hinoki cypress that was about 100 years old.

The theft of the bonsai trees adds to the city’s soaring crime records, which documented 15,000 vehicles stolen last year and criminals striking gas stations a dozen times or more per day.

 

Security camera footage shows thieves entered the Bonsai Garden in Lake Merritt, California, on Wednesday night

Security camera footage shows thieves entered the Bonsai Garden in Lake Merritt, California, on Wednesday night

The thieves returned again Thursday early morning, making off with eight bonsai trees worth approximately $20,000 in total

The thieves returned again Thursday early morning, making off with eight bonsai trees worth approximately $20,000 in total

Despite wooden walls, metal fences, and a surveillance camera, the thieves managed to break into the garden and steal the trees, including a hinoki cypress that was about 100 years old

Despite wooden walls, metal fences, and a surveillance camera, the thieves managed to break into the garden and steal the trees, including a hinoki cypress that was about 100 years old

Security camera footage shows thieves entered the garden at around 9:20 pm on Wednesday and then again after 4 am on Thursday.  

The eight bonsai trees include small hand-sized trees that the thieves were able to carry out through the fence, the garden’s curator Gary Tom told KTVU

They attempted to take a ninth tree, a 60-pound redwood, but it was too large to fit through the hole in

Read the rest

Hilton Head home next to HGTV finalist has 2x the lot and glass walls. Look inside

On Hilton Head, past the Sea Pines Plantation gate is a horseshoe-shaped home, owned by art lovers.

It’s meticulously decorated with original works from island and South Carolina locals. And there isn’t a single piece on the home’s U-fashioned back wall. No illustrations. No sculptures. No frames.

Instead, “it’s a moving picture,” Realtor Jeff Hunt said.

The back wall of 69 N Calibogue Cay Road — on the market for $8.499 million — is made almost entirely of glass. The nearly floor-to-ceiling windows overlook the Calibogue Sound and Buck Island. The marsh is the canvas. The background shifts as the tides move, and the focal points change with the seasons as birds migrate, and the color palette depends on where the sun is in the sky.

It carries a $1,887 annual property owners association fee and was last sold for $5.4 million in 2021, according to property records.

At 6,243 feet, the home has four bedrooms and five baths and sits on 1.23 acres, which is about double the acreage of most homes on the road, including a finalist for the HGTV.com Ultimate House Hunt 2023. The “moving picture” is not only unique for its view but the northern orientation of the home over the Calibogue Sound and Broad Creek mean that nothing, including neighboring docks or other structures will ever obstruct the canvas.

Walking past the three-car garage, steps take visitors to the home’s first floor, a full 16-feet above sea level. Ferns sway in hanging planters and begonias sit in window boxes on the porch. Their fragrance is easily forgotten, though, because as soon as the home’s door opens eucalyptus-peppermint wafts through. Essential oils are dispersed through the air system to scent the home.

While guests might not be able to put a finger on the aroma,

Read the rest