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Rise Garden Review: Hydroponic indoor garden system

About Rise Garden

Left: A person handling seed pods with the Rise Garden. Right: A hand lifting the Rise Garden shelves to show the hydroponic roots beneath the surface

Credit:
Reviewed / Danielle DeSiato

Proprietary seed pods make planting any Rise Garden quick and easy. The hydroponic root system makes for easy maintenance and strong plants.

Rise Garden was originally known for its Personal Garden—a countertop model that can grow 12 plants and only takes up 18 inches of counter space. We liked it so much we ranked it the best countertop hydroponic garden.

When Rise introduced the new, larger Rise Garden, we were immediately attracted to the beautiful furniture-like quality of the structure, and the flourishing plants in it. The modular, self-watering, LED-lit garden system comes in one-, two-, and three-tier options, plus two colors—Cloud or Charcoal. We tested the three-tier version in Charcoal.

The basic setup comes with 12 plant receptacles per tier but you can purchase interchangeable tray lids with spots for eight or 12 plants each, expanding the capacity of each level up to 36 plants.

The system works with proprietary seed pods that fit perfectly into the included cups. Each garden system comes with the 16 Starter Plant Variety Pack. You can also purchase a wide variety of vegetable, herb, and flower seed pods, or Seedless Pods, which are perfect for germinating your favorite seeds.

There’s a water tank hidden in the base of the unit and a pump that circulates water through the tiers. The full-spectrum LED lights mimic natural light to promote optimal growth, and Rise recommends they run for 16 hours per day.

Plus, the garden unit can be connected to the Rise Garden app. When you input all of the seedlings as you start to grow them, the app keeps track of their growth progress, gives you guidance on each growing phase, and alerts you to overall garden maintenance.

How we tested Rise Garden

Left: fresh basil growing in the Rise Garden. Right: A plated Caprese salad with produce from the Rise Gardens

Credit:
Reviewed

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